GRADUATE STUDIES PROSPECTUS              

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Name of Department: Institute of Gender & Development Studies

Head of Department:
Director of Institute/Centre: Professor Verene Shepherd

Departmental Preamble:    

The Institute for Gender and Development Studies (IGDS) is a multi-disciplinary department of the University of the West Indies (UWI), and is engaged in teaching, research, outreach and publication on issues relating to women, men/masculinities and gender, particularly in Caribbean society. In its outreach activities, IGDS embraces institutions and organisations at all levels throughout the region, sensitising educators, policy makers and the general public, and providing strategies to enhance awareness of the critical role played by the study of gender in personal life and national development.

The Institute for Gender and Development Studies is an independent Institute within the University of the West Indies — a decision taken by the University to underline its relevance to all disciplines and facilitate collaboration with all Faculties.

The IGDS consists of a Regional Co-ordinating Unit (RCU) located on the University’s Mona campus and headed by the University Director, and three Campus Units — at Cave Hill, Barbados; at Mona, Jamaica; and at St Augustine, Trinidad & Tobago.    


Name of Programme: PG Dip and MSc Gender & Development Studies

Specializations/Options (If Applicable):

Programme Objectives:

For the PGDip:

  1. To improve the quality of gender-based analysis in development processes in the public, private and NGOs sectors;
  2. To demonstrate the relevance of gender in Caribbean development;
  3. To provide interested persons with enhanced capacities to address issues of gender and development in a globalized world;
  4. To develop a cadre of well-trained gender and development specialists;


For the MSc:

  1. To improve the quality of gender-based analysis in development processes in the public, private and NGOs sectors;
  2. To demonstrate the relevance of gender in Caribbean development;
  3. To provide interested persons with enhanced capacities to address issues of gender and developmental in a globalized world;
  4. To strengthen the pool of academic institutions, civil society advocates and practitioners that train, teach or work in the area of women’s/gender and development studies at different levels;
  5. To develop a cadre of well-trained gender specialists;
  6. To facilitate gender-based research and publication in diverse subject areas;

Entry Requirements (For the Particular Programme):

Level 1 –Postgraduate Diploma in Gender and Development Studies (24 credits)

Applicants should have a first degree with at least a lower 2nd Class Honours (GPA 2.0 -2.99) or its equivalent. Preference will be given to students with some prior expose/experience in gender studies.  This could include the UWI Major or Minor in Gender and Development or its equivalent or at least three (3) courses chosen from the following:

 

GEND 2001    Gender in Caribbean Culture I: Theoretical Issues, History and Theology 

GEND 2002    Gender in Caribbean Culture II: Linguistics, Popular Culture and Literature

GEND 2101    Introduction to Women’s Studies I: Theoretical, Historical and Educational Perspectives

GEND 2102    Introduction to Women’s Studies II: Sociology and Cultural Issues

GEND 2013    Introduction to Men and Masculinities in the Caribbean

GEND 2003    Feminist Theorizing: The Connection between Theory and Practice

GEND 3031    Gender, Sex and Society

GEND 3501    The Philosophy of Gender

GEND 3502   The Philosophy of Gender in Caribbean Thought

OR

Persons without the required entry degree, but who have governmental/NGO experience in the field of gender and development will be considered on a case by case basis in keeping with University of the West Indies regulations.

The programme is constructed a full-time one year programme or a two year part-time programme during which time the candidate will have completed twenty-four credits (24), consisting of:

  1. 4 compulsory core courses (16 credits)
  2. 2 elective courses (8 credits)
  3. Participation in 1 research seminar (non-credit)

Level 2 – M.Sc. Gender and Development (36 credits)

Applicants should have a first degree with at least lower 2nd Class Honours (GPA 2.0-2.99) or its equivalent. Preference will be given to students with some prior training in gender studies.

This could include the UWI Major or Minor in Gender and Development or its equivalent or at least three (3) courses chosen from the following:

 

GEND 2001    Gender in Caribbean Culture I: Theoretical Issues, History and Theology 

GEND 2002    Gender in Caribbean Culture II: Linguistics, Popular Culture and Literature

GEND 2101    Introduction to Women’s Studies I: Theoretical, Historical and Educational Perspectives

GEND 2102    Introduction to Women’s Studies II: Sociology and Cultural Issues

GEND 2013    Introduction to Men and Masculinities in the Caribbean

GEND 2003    Feminist Theorizing: The Connection between Theory and Practice

GEND 3031    Gender, Sex and Society

GEND 3501    The Philosophy of Gender

GEND 3502   The Philosophy of Gender in Caribbean Thought

Persons who have completed the Post-Graduate Diploma in Gender and Development Studies can seek admission into the MSc within a three year period but will be required to do two additional  courses (6 credits), including the quantitative research methods course, and the research project/internship (6 credits).

OR

Persons without the required degree, but who have governmental/ NGO experience in the field of gender and development will be considered on a case by case basis in keeping with University of the West Indies regulations.


The M.Sc. programme is constructed as an 18 month full-time programme or a two year part-time programme during which time the candidate will have completed thirty-six credits (36), consisting of:


  1. 5 compulsory core courses (20 credits)
  2. 2 elective courses (8 credits)
  3. Participation in 2 research seminars (non-credit)
  4. Research paper supervised by a qualified researcher/academic in the relevant area – 20,000 words OR internship report (8 credits)


For Research Degrees: MPhil/PhD in Gender & Development Studies

(Areas of Research)

Gender and Caribbean History

Gender and HIV/AIDs in the Caribbean

Gender and Globalisation

Gender and Community Development

Gender and Governance

Gender and Education

Gender, Labour and Work

Gender and Violence

Gender, Power and Sexualities

Gender and Religion

Gender and Development Policy

Gender and Social Movements

Seminars (applicable to research degrees):

Numbers of Seminars required or to be presented


3 research seminars

Duration of programme:

MPhil - 3 years full time or 5 years part-time.

PhD – 5 years full time or 7 years part-time.

Programme Structure:

MPhil Programme Structure

The MPhil programme is offered as a 3 year full time programme or a 5 year part-time programme. Candidates will be required to complete a minimum of 6 credits of coursework during the first year. The following is recommended:

  • 1 core course (4 credits)
  • 2 research methods courses (8 credits)
  • Participation in 3 research seminars (non-credit)


Objectives:

  1. To improve the quality of gender-based analysis in development processes in the public, private and NGOs sectors;
  2. To demonstrate the relevance of gender in Caribbean development;
  3. To mould a new generation of experts and specialists in the area of gender/development and feminist studies;
  4. To expand the knowledge base from which to draw for academics and researchers. 
  5. Strengthen research skills and capacities for using gender as a tool of analysis.
  6. To increase the cadre of gender specialists who can engage in policy formulation and development planning.   

Admission Requirements 

Applicants should have a first degree with at least 1st Class Honours (GPA 3.0-3.99) or its equivalent or a postgraduate degree from a recognized tertiary institution. Preference will be given to students who have pursued the undergraduate Major/Minor in Gender and Development Studies and/or the MSc. in Gender and Development Studies.

PhD Programme Structure

The Ph.D. programme is a 5 year full time programme or a 7 year part-time programme. Candidates will be required to complete a minimum of 9 credits of coursework during the first year. The following is recommended:

  • 2 Core Courses (8 Credits)
  • 1 research methods courses (4 credits)
  • Participation in 3 research seminars (non-credit)

MPhil/PhD Candidates should:

  1.  Have the capacity to engage in independent work required for a research degree (evidenced by suitable referees in the field of research and a proposal detailing a selected field of study)
  2. Be capable of carrying out multivariate research projects.

MPhil/PhD

Candidates will be required to present and defend a Thesis Proposal at the end of the first year.

MPhil Thesis (50,000 words) PhD Thesis (80,000 words)

Courses (Core):

Course Code

Course Name

No. of Credits

Course

Weighting

GEND6101

Foundations of Feminist Methodology & Epistemology

4

100% in course assessment (2 assignments, 1 seminar presentation)

GEND6601

Key Theories & Debates in Gender & Development

4

50% in course assessment; 50% exam

GEND6001

Contemporary Feminist Theorising

4

50% in course assessment; 50% exam

 GEND6102

Data Collection and Analysis: A Gendered Approach

4

100% in course assessment (2 assignments)

GEND6502

Gender Analysis for Development Policy and Planning  

4

50% coursework; 50% exam

GEND9001

Thesis (Gender & Dev Studies) OR Internship Report

8

100% coursework (2 assignments, 1 seminar presentation)

 Electives (if applicable)

Course Code

Course Name

  No. of Credits

Course

Weighting

GEND6402

Gender & Political Mobilisation & Activism

4

50% coursework; 50% exam

GEND6105

Gender in Conflict Situations

4

50% coursework; 50% exam

GEND6201

Sexualities, Bodies and Power in Society  

4

50% coursework; 50% exam

GEND6202

Gender and Globalization 

4

50% coursework; 50% exam

                                         Broad Outline of Courses

(Course Code/Name) Course Description:

GEND6101: Foundations of Feminist Methodology & Epistemology

This course examines the challenge of feminist methodology and epistemology to traditional research methodology and epistemology. It exposes the myth of objectivity and clarifies concepts of feminist epistemology. This leads to an engagement of alternative perspectives in relation to the social sciences. It involves an analysis of social science research to evaluate classist, sexist and ethnocentric bias in research design, data collection and analysis and reporting. It also addresses the differential female and male experiences as data sources.

GEND6101: Key Theories and Debates in Gender & Development

This reading course is designed to expose students to key theories and debates in development and gender related developmental issues in the Caribbean.  A history of development discourse will be given as starting point. Key developmental paradigms – dependency, modernisation, sustainable development and eco-feminisms, the labour market, gender, structural adjustment and change in Caribbean development will also be addressed.

GEND6001: Contemporary Feminist Theorising

The course looks at the discursive strategies employed by Western philosophy and language in defining and constructing the category woman and womanhood as 'other', diseased and incomplete, in other words, a product of various pathologies.  It must be noted here that 'otherness' is not only created on the basis of biological sex or social gender; it is also created on the basis of geopolitics and, to that extent, the course will deliberately affirm the Caribbean experience as a valid standpoint from which to interrogate and theorise. Hence, our own personal and collective Caribbean experience, as well as relevant Caribbean scholarship, will be an integral part of this course.  The course is organised around four questions. Throughout the semester we will debate these four questions in so far as they comprise the constituent elements of the "Woman Question".


GEND6102: Data Collection and Analysis: A Gendered Approach

This course is designed to assist students develop their qualitative and quantitative data analysis skills. The course is based on the principle of mixed methods approach, often used in gender studies, where both qualitative and quantitative methods are used enhance the quality of the research and to interrogate social problems and issues from a gender perspective. This course builds on the ‘The Foundation of Feminist Methodology and Epistemology’ and will focus on issues related to the collection of quantitative data as well as basic approaches to analyzing and presenting univariate / bivariate and multivariate datasets. The course assessment will also allow students to apply information gathered from the Feminist Methodology as well as this course in the development of a research proposal related to a selected topic of relevance to the field of gender and development studies.

GEND6502: Gender Analysis for Development Policy and Planning

This course is designed to assist students develop their qualitative and quantitative data analysis skills. The course is based on the principle of mixed methods approach, often used in gender studies, where both qualitative and quantitative methods are used enhance the quality of the research and to interrogate social problems and issues from a gender perspective. This course builds on the ‘The Foundation of Feminist Methodology and Epistemology’ and will focus on issues related to the collection of quantitative data as well as basic approaches to analyzing and presenting univariate / bivariate and multivariate datasets. The course assessment will also allow students to apply information gathered from the Feminist Methodology as well as this course in the development of a research proposal related to a selected topic of relevance to the field of gender and development studies.

GEND6402: Gender & Political Mobilisation & Activism

Understanding how the patriarchy and the gender system continue to influence the participation of women and men in political decision-making and therefore affect the realities of life for families, communities and nations is fundamental to the struggle for transformation in governance in the 2l St century and therefore a critical aspect of studies in Gender and Development. Understanding of issues of gender and governance is a part of the foundation for activism to achieve the goal of gender equality and equity and the empowerment of women.

GEND6105: Gender in Conflict Situations

This course explores key theories and issues of gender and conflict situations in global as well as regional contexts. It also investigates how gender, violence and war impact upon development.  The course conceptualizes various forms of conflict situations in relation to gender ranging from total war and genocide to gender based violence in the private sphere. The course makes the link between prevailing gender inequalities and gender based violence, and also facilitates a gendered approach to the study of peace and justice initiatives. 


GEND6201: Sexualities, Bodies and Power in Society

The course exposes students to theoretical debates about the historical, social and psychological regulation of sexuality. It explores the importance of diverse sexual identities in controlling and ordering the structure of societies. This course is grounded in the theoretical, methodological and empirical realities of how sexuality functions as a distinguishing category of hierarchy and privilege. It examines the antagonism between bodies as natural, biological and socially controlled within the context of power and knowledge relations. Feminist analyses of the extent to which cultural messages about the ways that appropriate and transgressive masculinities, femininities and third gender categories are passively assimilated or actively resisted are debated. The importance of reproductive health care and safe sex campaigns are discussed. Interventions to increase the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people are discussed. The implications for social policies to improve the socio-sexual status of women and sexual minorities are also addressed in relation to wider power inequalities such as race, ethnicity and class.

GEND6202: Gender and Globalization 

This graduate course explores historical and current issues, concepts and debates relating to globalization within the context of neoliberal ideology. We will consider how women and men's experiences with globalization differ and change with the restructuring of the global political economy.  The course is divided into sections which explore the following questions: (i) How does globalization impact existing (gender) inequalities? (ii) How is it reconfiguring or producing new gender inequalities? (iii) What is the gendered impact of globalization in the Caribbean?


GEND9001: Thesis (Gender & Dev Studies) OR Internship Report

Research Paper (8 credits)

All M.Sc. students must complete, under academic supervision, either a written research project based on researching primary data or using secondary data sources on a subject chosen by the candidate in consultation with Faculty members OR complete a internship with an appropriately recognised NGO/public sector or research organization.

Topics for the research paper must be submitted to the IDGS by the end of the Second Semester of Year One and must be related to the general subject area of Gender and Development and approved by the Coordinator, Graduate Studies. A list of possible internship organizations will be provided to the students at the end of the first semester. Students wishing to pursue this alternative to the research project must indicate their commitment to the MSc. Coordinator by the beginning of semester two. The IGDS will be responsible for the placement and monitoring of the intern/student.

Upon approval of their topics for the research project/paper, students will be assigned supervisors who will subsequently work with them to determine the procedures to be followed for preparation of the research project, and for oral presentations.  Following the candidate’s completion of the coursework, the research paper (maximum 20,000 words, exclusive of footnotes and appendices) is to be submitted by the end of August of their second year. The Research Project must be written in accordance with the University’s Regulations.

Internship (8 credits)

A student may also choose to do an internship instead of a research project. This internship will consist of a placement with an appropriately recognised NGO/public sector or research organization for three (3) months (typically during the Summer months of June to August). This will be followed by an additional three (3) months to write an internship report.

Internships will be supervised by an internship supervisor assigned by the IGDS as well as someone in the agency identified to monitor and report on the student’s progress. The internship reports will be examined by the supervisor and another selected UWI examiner. The Institute will develop criteria for the selection of the appropriate organizations and will formulate a template for the internship report. This option is only open to students who can be registered full time for the duration of the internship.    

The internships are to provide the student with real experience relating to their degree and will be assigned to perform /participate in a relevant and challenging project(s). Effective assignments will be matched adequate supervision and will ensure interns are keeping pace and learning while doing about working in the field. All interns will be assigned in such a way that relates their academic work to practice and captures their work experience thus far. The intern will be involved in organization events such as staff meetings, workshops and seminars and allow opportunities for networking and informational interviewing with key personnel. All interns are required to submit an intern report at the end of her/his assignment. The internship placement will take place over the summer holidays for a period of three (3) months. The skills set of the potential intern must match up with some of the organization and must satisfy a specific need/task/project that the organization has.  An additional three (3) months will be allocated for the completion of the internship report once the placement has been completed. Supervision will be provided by the UWI IGDS and an on-site supervisor in the organization where the student is doing the internship. Interns will provide some useful assistance for the organization while also gaining on-the-job training that will assist them with their future career search. This will be identified and agreed upon between the IGDS and the organization prior to commencement of an internship.

Additional Information/Notes:

The offer of IGDS electives for any academic year will depend on the grouped research interests of the cohort as well as the availability of staff to offer these courses. In the initial stages of the programme not all electives will be offered.  The expansion of the number of electives will depend on the numbers of students enrolled and the availability of teaching staff.

Department Contact Information:

Professor Verene Shepherd, Director

Institute of Gender & Development Studies
University of the West Indies, Mona Campus
Kingston 7, Jamaica CBN
Tel: (876) 927 1913, ext 2494
Fax: (876) 927 0641

Programme Coordinator:

Ms Taitu Heron 
Lecturer in Political Economy/ Programme Coordinator
Institute of Gender & Development Studies
University of the West Indies, Mona Campus
Kingston 7, Jamaica CBN
Tel: (876) 927 1913, ext 2494
Fax: (876) 927 0641
Primary email:
taheron@gmail.com
Secondary email:  
taitu.heron02@uwimona.edu.jm

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